2017 Brings More Tesla Superchargers and New Usage Regulations

by Bianca Rodriguez

Tesla Superchargers are currently the best and fastest charging option for long-distance travelers driving one of Tesla’s all-electric vehicles. A Supercharger takes a mere 30 minutes to replenish batteries from 10% to 80% charge, enough time to take a restroom break or grab a coffee during a long trip; or 75 minutes to reach a full 100% charge, enough time for a meal at a nearby restaurant. A battery charged at 80% will provide about 170 miles of driving range, which should be enough to reach the next Supercharger along some of the more popular routes. Even so, Tesla is continuing to increase the number of Supercharger locations around the world to fill the need of an increasing population of Tesla drivers. This is especially necessary due to the new Tesla Model 3, which is expected to be available after 2018. Starting at $35,000, the Model 3 is Tesla’s most affordable car and will most likely increase the number of Tesla drivers as more people will be able to afford these high-tech full electric vehicles. Continue reading

Nomadic Power: Mobile Batteries for Electric Cars

by Deedee Chao

Nomadic Power, a German start-up founded in 2014, is looking at electric vehicle charging in a new way, by developing mobile lithium ion batteries that can charge a vehicle in 20 minutes or less. If this business and model become viable, electric vehicles would no longer be bound to short trips and frequent stops at charging stations, and electric car charging infrastructure can be “mobilized” and more easily set up in different locations. Continue reading

Swedish Research Project Proposes Electric Car Batteries… Made of Wood?

by Gage Taylor

These days, it seems rare that a week passes where we don’t hear about some new kind of exotic or outlandish approach to electric car construction. With technology moving at a breakneck pace and interest in the field at an all-time high, concerns over range, power delivery, and cost are to be expected. But where most announcements seem to revolve around nanotechnology or other synthetic materials, a team of researchers from the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden announced this week that they’d constructed a small-scale model of an electric vehicle battery pack made from wood. By developing a new carbon-fiber material which has lignin, a natural polymer found in nearly every dry-land plant on earth, as its main ingredient, they’ve made a big step toward cheaper, more energy-dense batteries. Continue reading