Two Companies Innovate Electric Buses in the United States

by Nadja Redmond

Transit vehicles are mostly powered by unrenewable power sources, such as gasoline, compressed natural gas (CNG), or diesel, with batteries only encompassing 1% of the market. Bus manufacturer Proterra claims that its Electric transit buses are cheaper than the alternative diesel and CNG options. It’s CEO, Ryan Popple, is making predictions that, in the next 10 years, electric transit buses powered by renewable energy will dominate the market. Specifically, he predicts that the majority of bus sales will be electric by 2025, and all new bus sales to transit agencies will be electric by 2030. [https://electrek.co/2017/02/13/electric-buses-proterra-ceo/]. King Country Metro Transit signed a deal for 73 buses with the company for use in and around the Seattle area. These buses can travel 23 miles between charges, with charges taking 10 minutes or less. Continue reading

Municipal Solid Waste: To the Landfill or the Incinerator?

by Nadja Redmond

A global phenomenon is slowly beginning to pick up traction and conversation in the United States: energy recovery through use of waste to energy facilities. WtE, the waste management process that involves generating electricity and/or heat from waste through combustion, is already widely used in Europe. By 2014, Europe had 452 such facilities [http://www.cewep.eu/information/data/studies/m_1488], and compared to the United States’ 71, it is no secret there is an ongoing debate on whether WtE facilities are effective or hazardous for the environment and for the communities they inhabit. When the country produces over 250 million tons of municipal solid waste a year [https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=25732], alternative routes of waste management and energy recovery that utilizes that waste that have proved effective overseas are worth considering. Continue reading