Scotland, London Propose New Low Emission Zones

by Kieran McVeigh

Scotland may become the latest country in Europe to institute low emission zones in their major urban centers. In January of 2017 the Scottish ministers proposed piloting a “low emissions zone” in the most polluted areas of Scottish cities to reduce pollution and help meet Scotland’s greenhouse gas reduction goals. These goals are among the most aggressive in the world with an end goal of an 80% reduction in green house gases by 2050. The proposed low emission zone would prevent vehicles that create higher then average amounts of pollution like trucks or “lorries” as they’re referred across the pond, from driving in the low emission parts of the city. Continue reading

Hydrogen Cars: Open Roads but with out Enough Filling Stations

by Kieran McVeigh

This weekend as I zoomed along the ten freeway passing thousands of cars I found myself wondering what happened to Hydrogen fuel cars that in the early 2000’s were heralded as the next big thing. A late January article in Bloomberg technology gave me my answer, hydrogen fuel cells cars are alive and well. Many car manufacturers are preparing to or have already rolled out commercially available hydrogen fuel cars but these cars face major logistical hurdles because of the lack of available hydrogen fuel stations.

With the introduction of Toyota’s Mirai, hydrogen fuel cell cars became commercially available in 2016, however Hydrogen comes at a price as a Mirai starts at about 60,000 dollars. Toyota currently only makes 3,000 Mirai a year so if demand and production ramp up this price will likely decrease. The major hurdle more then the relative expense of hydrogen fuel cell cars is the lack of network of filling stations. California leads the way with a total of 100 hydrogen fuel stations. Hydrogen fuel manufacturers insist that government subsidies are necessary for hydrogen fuel infrastructure to be completed, saying the costs of creating hydrogen fuels stations currently outweigh the benefits. As the all-too familiar problem surrounding global warming of how to get people take responsibility for our planets wellbeing when it will cut into their pocket books. Continue reading