Berkeley National Laboratory Scientists Inventing Paint-on Retrofit for Energy Efficient Windows

by Erin Larsen

The US Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) researchers are in the process of developing a paint-on coating for windows to increase energy efficiency. It is estimated that 10 percent of aggregate energy consumption in buildings in the US is due to window performance. Warm and southern climates are particularly impacted because a significant fraction of energy usage goes to air conditioning. This inefficiency costs building owners about $50 billion annually. While window replacement or other commercially available retrofits would resolve this problem, the high cost of these options is prohibiting. Berkeley Lab’s polymer heat-reflective coating that can be painted on would be $1.50 per square foot, one-tenth the current market for commercially installed energy efficient retrofit window coatings. Continue reading

Tidal and Wave Power Full of Promise in Scotland

by Erin Larsen

In the northeast-most corner of Scotland sits the future site of the world’s largest array of tidal turbines, undersea windmills turned by the waters. As the race to develop alternatives to fossil fuels continues to accelerate, ocean energy is a clean-tech holy grail. Now, with Scotland’s estimated $1.5 billion MeyGen turbine project under way, the promise of tidal energy has never been closer.

Once all the undersea cables are laid, substations are built, and 269 turbines are put in place, MeyGen will have a production capacity of 400 megawatts of power – enough to power 175,000 homes. The project is being overseen by Atlantis Resources. Continue reading

Oslo Pilots CCS System at Waste Incineration Plant to Slow Climate Change

by Erin Larsen

Norway just became the first country to attempt to capture CO2 from the fumes of burning trash. A test plant at a waste incinerator in Klemetsrud will test several technologies for CO2 capture with a goal of presenting results to the government by June 2016. If successful, this innovative project will be a huge step forward for carbon capture technology and will help Norway mitigate the environmentally degrading impacts of its largest emission source. Continue reading

Designing Energy Systems to Be More Like Trees

by Erin Larsen

A team of engineers at Ohio State University are looking to nature to redesign windmills. In a recent issue of the Journal of Sound and Vibration, OSU researchers reported that they have discovered new information about how vibrations pass through trees when they sway in the wind. They believe that this research can be used to design new tools for harvesting wind energy that look less like windmills and more like mechanical trees. Continue reading